Film Faces

Home | About

Hot Topic

Kim Kardashian

Kim Kardashian

“I’ll be pregnant by the time I’m 30…hopefully.” Kim Kardashian interview By E.C. Gladstone Many see Kim Kardashian as ...

Leading Men

Jon Cryer

Jon Cryer

“I’m at the perfect level of fame” JON CRYER By Eric Gladstone Lunching with Jon Cryer in a Los ...

Women on Top

Olivia Wilde

Olivia Wilde

“I belong somewhere trapped in a castle in the 14th century, in the rain, churning butter…” Olivia ...

Directors

John Waters

John Waters

“I feel like Uncle Remus every time a kid comes up and says, ‘Tell ...

Power Players

Leo DiCaprio at 21

Leo DiCaprio at 21

"At first, I didn't see any reason why we should do it again." By: EC Gladstone September ...

Michelle Williams

MichelleWilliamsDeception

“Have you seen the fucking pictures I’ve done? They’re all about my breasts. That’s just not who I am, and it makes me feel kind of…dirty.”

MICHELLE WILLIAMS
By Eric Gladstone

Michelle Williams does not want to talk about sex. Despite the fact that she is most identified for playing the highly sexualized Jen Lindley on “Dawson’s Creek,” that she disrobed night after night on a New York stage last year, and that she features in a steamy love scene in HBO’s lesbian-themed “If These Walls Could Talk 2,” the teen actress thinks being a sex symbol is not much of an aspiration. “Sex symbol, sex pot,” she spits out. “That’s worthless to me, that’s gutter filth.”

Instead, like another misunderstood blonde before her—Marilyn Monroe—Michelle is more interested in books. Browsing the hushed hallways of Los Angeles’ Heritage Bookshop, a dealer of rare volumes she visits frequently, Williams takes stock of some of her favorite authors. She looks at a Thomas Pynchon, considers Phillip Roth, Upton Sinclair and J.D. Salinger, and asks about Dostoyevsky. And, as if to prove she isn’t just a literary tourist, notes in passing that she “can’t get through Faulkner” and doesn’t like Hemingway. You wouldn’t have an easy time finding a 19 year old so well read, especially one who’s had practically no formal schooling since the ninth grade. Finally, she settles on a first edition Tennessee Williams collection (containing a favorite play, “This Property Is Condemned”). It sets her back nearly $300.

Michelle has been collecting such editions since she “all of a sudden had the money,” thanks to the success of “Dawson’s Creek” three years ago. Her prized possessions are a rare copy of Ibsen’s “The Doll’s House” and an antique set of Shakespeare in its raw state. “Some are so old, like the Shakespeare, that you can’t really read them,” she explains dreamily. “But I touch them. And I smell them. And I run my hands over them. And I have an affair with them,” she chuckles. “It’s about as interesting as my sex life gets.”

That seems hard to believe, not so much because of her steady relationship with indie director Morgan J. Freeman (Hurricane Streets, Desert Blue), but for the free-spirited sensuality the actress exudes as “Linda” in the “1972” segment of “If These Walls Could Talk 2.” In the most erotically-charged of the three lesbian-themed tales, Michelle’s feminist bra-burning character falls for a politically incorrect butch dyke played by Chloe Sevigny, who seduces her in a revealing nude scene.

“It’s a really vulnerable place to be” Michelle says, of shooting the explicit scene. “But I’m also really glad that my first love scene was with a woman. It was a really natural process.”

How natural was it? Well, ask the actress what kissing Sevigny felt like and she exclaims, “Have you seen her? She’s fucking hot!” But Michelle backtracks when asked if that lifestyle interests her.

“I think that everybody is probably curious by nature,” she responds coyly, realizing that we are, yes, talking about sex–something she doesn’t want to do, “without a cigarette,” at least.

Later, lighting an American Spirit outside a nearby hotel, she continues: “It just seems completely irrelevant to me, because it doesn’t make me any more or less qualified to play a lesbian.” And, she emphasizes, the tele-film “isn’t about a love scene, it’s about love.”

“It was a brave scene for them,” says Martha Coolidge, director of the segment. “[Michelle had] a tremendous commitment to what the movie was about. She really believed in the sort of humanist anti-discrimination idea behind the whole project.”

Continued at Pt. 2

Read More

–FF–

Copyright 2000, 2009 ECG

Leave a Reply

Sponsors
Green Hour - Discover the Wonder of Nature
Advertisement